• Virginia Glass House

    An extraordinary design collaboration between client and firm, this bucolic retreat was planned for ten wooded acres in Virginia near the Potomac River. Created for a New York resident with family and professional ties to Washington, DC, the design is comprised of four separate structures—a house, a private art gallery, a guest cottage, and a utility building and carport. A central geothermal mechanical plant, housed underneath the utility building, ensures high energy efficiency throughout. The primary building materials—glass, concrete, limestone, teak, and steel—are consistent across the complex.

    The 1,800 sf main residence represented a challenging experiment in load-bearing glass construction. The sheer walls of laminated glass were engineered to support the roof with no columns. Partial-height wood walls create an entry foyer with coat closets and screen a small study or guest alcove from the main space. The kitchen consists of a stainless steel box hung from a teak-clad block that contains two bathrooms. A motorized drape can be drawn down from a slot in the ceiling to separate the master sleeping area from the living area.  

    In preparation for designing the project, Monty and the client visited Philip Johnson’s Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut, and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House in Plano, Illinois. Both were inspirations for the client, who was seeking a 21st century equivalent. 

    (unbuilt)

Virginia Glass House

Virginia

Virginia Glass House

An extraordinary design collaboration between client and firm, this bucolic retreat was planned for ten wooded acres in Virginia near the Potomac River. Created for a New York resident with family and professional ties to Washington, DC, the design is comprised of four separate structures—a house, a private art gallery, a guest cottage, and a utility building and carport. A central geothermal mechanical plant, housed underneath the utility building, ensures high energy efficiency throughout. The primary building materials—glass, concrete, limestone, teak, and steel—are consistent across the complex.

The 1,800 sf main residence represented a challenging experiment in load-bearing glass construction. The sheer walls of laminated glass were engineered to support the roof with no columns. Partial-height wood walls create an entry foyer with coat closets and screen a small study or guest alcove from the main space. The kitchen consists of a stainless steel box hung from a teak-clad block that contains two bathrooms. A motorized drape can be drawn down from a slot in the ceiling to separate the master sleeping area from the living area.  

In preparation for designing the project, Monty and the client visited Philip Johnson’s Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut, and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House in Plano, Illinois. Both were inspirations for the client, who was seeking a 21st century equivalent. 

(unbuilt)