• Center for Molecular Recognition, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons

    Columbia’s Center for Molecular Recognition (CMR) was founded in 1989 within the university’s medical school to provide a focus for research on the structure and function of membrane receptors and transport proteins. BFA’s commission for the Center consisted of the renovation of 5,000 sf of extant space in a 1925 building to create a laboratory for advanced research in neurobiology.

    The suite includes open bench labs, electronics and computer labs, controlled environment rooms, offices, and a library. The principal materials, selected for their durability, include epoxy, stainless steel, zinc, and maple. Dr. Arthur Karlin, director of the CMR, was dissatisfied with the lightweight construction of standard laboratory furniture, so BFA specified industrial shop furniture specially adapted for laboratory use. An accomplished abstract painter, Dr. Karlin was also a welcomed collaborator in developing the lab's sleek, modern aesthetic with its black and white color palette complemented by accents of metal, maple, and colorful upholstered furniture.

Center for Molecular Recognition, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons

New York, NY

Center for Molecular Recognition, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons

Columbia’s Center for Molecular Recognition (CMR) was founded in 1989 within the university’s medical school to provide a focus for research on the structure and function of membrane receptors and transport proteins. BFA’s commission for the Center consisted of the renovation of 5,000 sf of extant space in a 1925 building to create a laboratory for advanced research in neurobiology.

The suite includes open bench labs, electronics and computer labs, controlled environment rooms, offices, and a library. The principal materials, selected for their durability, include epoxy, stainless steel, zinc, and maple. Dr. Arthur Karlin, director of the CMR, was dissatisfied with the lightweight construction of standard laboratory furniture, so BFA specified industrial shop furniture specially adapted for laboratory use. An accomplished abstract painter, Dr. Karlin was also a welcomed collaborator in developing the lab's sleek, modern aesthetic with its black and white color palette complemented by accents of metal, maple, and colorful upholstered furniture.